What’s a sweet-toothed Serbian art installation doing in a skip in Selfridges?

What's a sweet-toothed Serbian art installation doing in a skip in Selfridges?

Serbian artist Maja Djordjevic is taking over one of London’s best-loved shopping destinations with a candy-coloured art installation that mixes the playful and the subversive.

Nothing to Wear Again features the free-spirited female nude which dominates her work, where each piece starts life as a single picture created on 90s childhood staple, Microsoft Paint.

The two nudes in Djordjevic’s latest piece sit atop a melting mound of pink ice cream, liberated from the male gaze and taking on their own adventures.

The work will take pride of place in Selfridges’ flagship store on Oxford Street until 17 March, finding its home in a dedicated skip — otherwise known as SKIP Gallery. Curated by artist-curator duo Baker & Borowski, the gallery’s Like It Lump It project has been included as part of Selfridges’ State of the Arts campaign to make art 
more accessible.

Djordjević’s work will appear alongside two other artists — Paul Kindersley and Claire Pearce — to explore subjects ranging from identity, body politics, and gender to authenticity and cultural history.

“In an age of frightening conservatism we have gravitated towards artists that are trying to push back,” says Lee Baker, co-founder SKIP Gallery. “Our choice of artists for Selfridges has definitely come from the questions the artists raise about the notions of beauty and identity in the 21st century.”

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