A secret exhibition in the backwoods of Budapest asks how we can heal our connection to nature

A secret exhibition in the backwoods of Budapest asks how we can heal our connection to nature

7 May 2020
Top image: 'Banned Spring' by Botond Keresztesi and 'Even the slowest make it to the finish' by Tom Volkaert

A Hungarian art collective has launched an art exhibition in an undisclosed forest to reflect on and redefine the future relationship between people and nature.

In the exhibition, which goes by the name Neopangean Nest, surrealist paintings and sculptures blend with the foliage in unforeseen corners of the forest. Artists Botond Keresztesi, Ádám Ulbert, and Tom Volkaer have chosen to look forward to the year 3000, envisioning a dystopian reality in which “human-animal-machine hybrids” inhabit a harmonious forest community.

Tucked away in a secret location in a forest in Budapest, Neopangean Nest can be visited while respecting social distancing measures. To get the exact whereabouts, you must inquire through the venue’s website.

The exhibition is included in the programme of Keep Showing Club, an initiative started by Budapest-based platform Everybody Needs Art to continue showcasing art during the Covid-19 pandemic. Founded by Hungarian art dealer Peter Bencze as a response to the exclusivity of traditional art galleries, Everybody Needs Art regularly holds exhibitions and events to promote the work of young artists in Hungary.

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