Russian DJ Philipp Gorbachev needs you to start dancing… to cymbals

Russian DJ Philipp Gorbachev needs you to start dancing... to cymbals

21 September 2021

Who: Philipp Gorbachev, one of Moscow’s star DJs. Gorbachev is well-known for fusing hypnotic, sacral sounds such as tolling bells in his dance tracks — in 2016, he even worked for a year at the Church of St Nicholas in the village of Aksinino to master the art of bellringing. But while his days were spent in the churchyard, his nights saw him return to his post as a resident DJ for Moscow’s famous Mutabor venue.

What: Following a brief hiatus after releasing his church bell-inspired EP Kolokol in late 2019, and his single “Nobody Understands” in 2020, Gorbachev is back with “Jump High”: an intoxicatingly upbeat track produced by German label Schalen, and released on 27 August. Alongside Gorbachev’s original remix, the release features a techno remix by DJs Almaty and Ozzy, and an electronica remix by Canadian DJ Deadbeat.

What they say: “The name says it all — ‘Jump High’ is a pure call to action,” Gorbachev said on Instagram. “It is strictly for a non-vinyl environment; it is a dancefloor-friendly track.”

Why you need to listen: Gorbachev’s tracks are well-thought out, experimental, and endlessly surprising, and “Jump High” is no exception. While previous tracks saw the sound of bells infuse techno sounds with a hypnotic instrumental layer, his new release is all about cymbals. Metallic reverberations both lead and take over the beat, creating an involving, uplifting atmosphere that is not only a call to dance, but also a hypnotic listen away from the club.

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